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Guidance for DTG Printing on Triblend Garments

Last, but not least, it's time to learn how to Direct-To-Garment print on triblend garments! DTG Extraordinaire Luke Ryerkerk will share his wisdom on the topic so you can exceed expectations on your next print job.

The bulk of the tips for printing on triblends are the same as 50/50 garments. Please refer to the pretreat, printer and cure settings discussed in that blog.

The big key with triblends comes down to garment selection and curing with a dryer if possible.

GARMENT SELECTION

  • Not all tri-blends (or any apparel actually) is made equally.
  • The dying process of the polyester and the third element (outside of cotton) is what will really make the triblends work well.
  • Allmade’s dye process and the use of Modal in the recipe make it for a great Tri Blend.
  • There is also another triblend from District that works great and is consistent with printing. 
  • The key thing to do is test the garments you like to use and find alternatives if you continue to get dye migration or staining issues.
    • Even after all the tricks and tips discussed with 50/50s.

LEARN THE SIX QUESTIONS TO ASK WHEN BUYING A DTG PRINTER

four dtg printers

Screen & Stitch have a rad DTG setup!

DRYER SETTINGS

    • You can cure triblends with a heat press, but a conveyor dryer is much better since we don’t have to worry about the pressing issues that can come up with triblends.
    • Using a Heat Press?
      • If you have to use a heat press, increase your hovering time, lower the temp to as low as 300℉ and lower the time a bit.
        • If your hover time is typically 30 seconds, take it to 45 or 60.
        • Lower your press time to 90 or even less depending on wash tests. 
    • Using a Dryer?
      • Lower the temperature and slow the belt down a bit.
      • Some dryers will require you to run them through twice at a slightly faster speed to avoid dye migration and scorching.
  • Always make dyer changes in 10% increments when testing.

There you have it, folks. You now know how to DTG print on 100% cotton, 50/50, and triblends. Have a DTG printer in your shop? We want to see what prints you're making with it! Post your prints on Instagram and tag us or use #ryonet. 

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