The Easiest Way to Make a Print Pop on a White Shirt  | Screenprinting.com

The Easiest Way to Make a Print Pop on a White Shirt

Sage Larson
Golden Press Studio turns up the heat with a multicolor, Miami Vice-themed print for a tattoo shop. Needing to print a two-color pocket, four-color back, and one-color sleeve, the shop takes on the challenge to make this bodacious print. Watch the team burn the screens, register, print, and cure to make a vibrant, vibin' print. All done with standard FN-INK™ colors. 
How to Print Your Own Custom Boxes  | Screenprinting.com

How to Print Your Own Custom Boxes

Sage Larson
Why bother customizing the boxes you ship garments in? It's actually a small, but significant way to stand out from the crowd and look incredibly professional. That package is the customer's first impression of your business, why not make it a good one? Luckily, it's fairly easy to print on cardboard boxes. Rogue Lab Owner Lee Stuart breaks down every step of the process — from creating the artwork to curing the ink — so you can customize your own boxes effortlessly. 
Should I Screen Print or Decorate with Vinyl?  | Screenprinting.com

Should I Screen Print or Decorate with Vinyl?

Sage Larson
Ready to start decorating garments? There are many ways you can go about decorating garments — embroidery, screen printing, vinyl, etc. How do you decide which one is best for you? Let’s focus on screen printing and vinyl to distinguish which method will fit your business.
How to Screen Print Wet on Wet Halftones and Color Blends for a Vintage Look  | Screenprinting.com

How to Screen Print Wet on Wet Halftones and Color Blends for a Vintage Look

Sage Larson
Remember when expert Colin Huggins showed how to create halftones and blends in Adobe Illustrator? Now he's printing that design. Watch to learn how to print wet-on-wet halftones and blends, tips to get the best colors and blends, and how shirt colors affect the look of the print.
Mesh Count and You  | Screenprinting.com

Mesh Count and You

Sage Larson

Different mesh counts are used for different applications in the screen printing process. What is mesh count? Well, mesh count is a measure of how many threads of polyester (used to be silk, centuries ago, hence ‘silkscreening’) cross each other per square inch of the screen. For example, a 110 mesh screen would have 110 threads crossing per square inch. The higher the mesh count, the finer the holes are in the screen. 

Labor Day Learning; How To Screen Print Series

Kaitlyn Ingram

“The best investment you can make, is an investment in yourself… The more you learn, the more you’ll earn.”  -Warren Buffet The more you learn, the more you’ll earn… This is especially true with screen printing.  Screen printing is a multi-faceted profession, with a lot of different ways to do the same thing: Make a […]

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